Slow Photography

Douglas Gayeton’s Slow: Life in a Tuscan Town (Welcome Books) is pornography for the Heat-reading set. It is the Slow Food movement brought to art (it even has its own dinner tour). It is a series of portraits of a rural town in Italy where Gayeton lived, worked, cooked, fell in love, and took pictures—tons of pictures, many of which were then stitched together and inscribed with captions, names, anecdotes, and recipes to tell his story of assimilation. It is also, to be frank, a heavy-ass tome—Peter Mayle would probably throw it against a wall out of envy, if he could pick it up. --Slow Photography - The Morning News.

Check out the slideshow in the interview. Each of Gayeton's photos is made of dozens, hundreds, of individual photographs combined together in a technique not unlike that used by David Hockney. Each image is a collaboration with the subjects who worked with him for weeks on the writing that overlaps it.

Photography.Book.Now competition sponsored by Blurb

Photography.Book.Now
Got a book in you? This looks like it might be a fun project (the chance to win $25,000 is just icing, really):

The Photography.Book.Now International Juried Competition seeks entries for its second annual competition celebrating self-published photography books and the photographers behind them. The grand prize is $25,000 to finish – or start – a photography project of the winner’s choice. Entries will be accepted in three categories – Fine Art, Editorial, and Commercial. The first-prize winner in each category will receive a private portfolio review with members of the judging panel.

Submissions will be accepted through 12:00 pm PDT on July 16, 2009, at http://www.photographybooknow.com. The Photography.Book.Now International Juried Competition is presented by Blurb, the creative publishing and marketing platform that enables anyone to design, publish, share and sell bookstore-quality books.

Details on the three categories (these are new for 2009):

  • Fine Art: The field of contemporary art is the arena to which many photographers now aspire. Whether your working methods are conceptual or stylistic, your aesthetic deadpan or modernist, or your artistic practice rooted in the world or performance, this is your chance to showcase your best photography in book form.
  • Editorial: Photography can create compelling narratives, especially in book form. Whether it's a long-term project, a photo-documentary, or a series of editorial spreads, this category celebrates the photography book as an experience that is more than just the sum of its parts.
  • Commercial: Superb commercial photography—which can include fashion, corporate, and advertising work—goes beyond just a great product shot. The commercial photographer understands the importance of distinctive visual aesthetics and arresting branding. From fashion to advertising photography, we invite you to showcase your most compelling commercial work in book form.

Review: David Pogue’s Digitial Photography: The Missing Manual

Digital Photography: The Missing ManualDigital Photography: The Missing Manual from O'Reilly sets out to answer all of the questions beginning photographers face before and after they open their new cameras and file away the unopened and often unfriendly manual that came with it.

I'm giving away my review copy. Read on to find out how to enter the drawing.

For the digital novice, this book opens with two chapters on choosing a new camera in the first place. These chapters are great if you don't know what to look for in a digital camera or you find yourself exasperated from teaching a friend or relative about megapixels and digital sensors. The advice can help you determine what you need, what's important, and what can be ignored.

The following five chapters deal with actually using the camera itself. Chapter 4 covers decisions that are often made on a shot-by-shot basis, chapter 5 is devoted to avoiding blur. Chapter 6 contains nothing but "recipes" for certain types of shots: panoramas, frozen action, classic sunsets, outdoor portraits, etc.

Chapter 7 has a little advice specifically for SLR owners. But other than that and few notes here and there, this book is really for any beginner regardless of camera type.

The book concludes with Part 3 which is sort of a short course in using iPhoto and Picasa. And Part 4 deals with printing and sharing photos online.

All in all, it's a pretty good book for: anyone new to digital photography who needs help choosing a camera; beginners who feel that the owners manual that came with their camera was, to put it nicely, somewhat lacking in helpful information; folks who need help learning how to use iPhoto or Picasa; or for photographers who need instructions for taking certain kinds of photos (the recipes in Chapter 6).

Pogue does a great job of explaining, in easy to understand language, what can sometimes be a complicated topic. It's nonintimidating, easy to read, and provides a good introduction to the breadth of digital photography topics from choosing a camera to keeping digital backups.

Buy this book at Amazon.com →

To get my review copy, leave a comment with a valid email address. I'll choose a recipient at random this weekend.

This book was provided to Photodoto free of charge for review.

I Only Want One Job…

I'm sure this is a sentiment many people can sympathise with at the moment. I came across this photo in Improperganda: Art of the Publicity Stunt which I've been enjoying flicking through very sporadically over the last few weeks. If you get the chance it's worth a look through, the book is an investigation into some of the greatest PR stunts and scams of all time, with some great photographs. I'm not sure it's actually worth buying but definitely worth a loan from the library.

sandwhichboard

Review: Odysseys and Photographs

Odysseys and Photographs

I finally had a chance to sit down with this book over two nights and read it through. And I'm bummed out that I didn't do it sooner. Odysseys and Photographs: Four National Geographic Field Men is fantastic.

Read the rest of the review and find out how you can get a free copy of this book.

These amazing biographies, written by editors, friends, and spouses, bring us a personal and stirring account of four National Geographic photographers. Each story reveals the adventurous spirit and innovation these gifted photographers brought to their craft. From Maynard Williams' epic 10 month overland crossing of the Asian continent in 1931, to Luis Marden's pioneering work with underwater photography and his discovery of the Bounty in 1957, to Volkmar Wentzel's adventure prompted by his editor to "Do India," to Thomas Abercrombie's coverage of the Middle East in the 60s and 70s---these men all seemed to be the right man at the right place at the right time in history.

Each essay, lovingly written, reveals details about these men and their assignments that were only known to friends and colleagues, and provide an account that gives an intoxicating glimpse of what it must have been like to be a National Geographic Field Man in these golden years. These men were the Indiana Jones' of photography.

Accompanied by beautiful 8 and 10-inch photographs throughout, Odysseys and Photographs covers nearly a century of world history--the people, the places, the politics---in a behind-the-scenes kind of way, through the eyes of these gifted photographers, writers, adventurers.

Click here to buy this book from Amazon.com.

Want my review copy? Leave a comment with a valid email address. One reader will be chosen at random this weekend to receive a free copy.

This book was provided to Photodoto free of charge for review.

Page 1 of 212
Google+